Winter Warmers

It is DEFINITELY winter!  Especially here in the beautiful Cape Town.

It is so cold, I just can’t seem to get warm.  My hands, feet and nose are all freezing…all the time.

Last night I realised I only have 2 warm coats and one leather biker style jacket to keep me warm…we went out for a quick bite and I had to dress warmly as the wind was howling and it was raining.  One of my 2 coats is a ‘hand-me-down’ vintage coat from when my mom was a student…so it’s really old.  It basically has no lining left, although the outer still looks good.

I’ve decided it is time for a new coat and jacket.  Something that fits properly, is not too bulky and heavy, but can keep me warm.  And where better place to start my search than trusted Woolies.

Here’s a couple of great choices.  And what’s more, they’re ranging in price between R500 – R850, so it is not going to ‘break the bank’.

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One thing I have noticed is some of this season’s jacket styles are quite ‘boxy’.  Not flattering for most body shapes…especially when you’re a juicy apple.  Anything that is not nipped in at the waist will make your upper body appear even bigger/rounder and is not flattering at all.

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Now if I can just get myself to move away from the heater and leave my cosy house to actually go and try them on.

(all images: http://www.woolworths.co.za/Home/Women/Jackets-Coats)

Choosing eyeshadow

One of the most common questions I get asked almost on a weekly basis is:

“How do I choose the correct shade of eyeshadow to compliment my eye colour?”

Well, It’s actually not as complicated as you might think.

The most important thing when choosing eyeshadow & liner is your own eye colour.  You want to select shades that will bring out the natural colour of your eye.  You want your eye colour to pop and stand out, not for your eyeshadow to compete with your natural eye colour.

The 3 basic eye colours, in varying shades, are Blue, Green and Brown.  There are also 2 other colours, which are Hazel and Grey.  Hazel eyes is a combination of Green & Blue or Green & Brown.  Grey eyes is a very pale shade of either Blue or Green.

eyes

(ok, so all these eyes put together looks a bit freaky & scary)

Lots of people think/assume wrongly that choosing the same eyeshadow shade as your eye colour will bring out your eye colour.  This is not true.  Wearing the same shade of clothes sometimes do that, especially for blue and green eyes, but not eyeshadow.  Wearing the same colour distracts/takes away from the eyeshadow colour and eye colour and gives a dull nondescript tone of ‘nothingness’.

First off, lets start with the colour wheel:

colourwheel1

The rule of thumb is this: to best compliment your eye colour, choose the colour closest to your eye colour on the colour wheel. The exact opposite colour on the wheel will be your best complimenting colour.  For example, for blue eyes, choose a warm shade of brown or golden shades.  For green eyes coppery, warm browns or purple will make the green of your eyes look brighter and much more green.  Whenever you pair two oposite colours, they intensify each other.

Blue Eyes:

As already mentioned, stay far away from blue eyeshadow. If you want you eyes to pop and look mesmerising  try earth-tones such as warm browns and golden, copper, golden khaki, rich raisin, browns with a slight purple base, taupe, slate coloured greys and charcoal. If you want to have a little fun outside of the earth-tones, try a rose colored eyeshadow. The coolness from the pink/purple eyeshadow will be a really nice contrast to your blue eyes.

Copperplate

Copperplate

Cranberry

Cranberry

Sable

Sable

Satin Taupe

Satin Taupe

Sketch

Sketch

Contrast

Contrast

Amber Lights

Amber Lights

Bronze

Bronze

All That Glitter

All That Glitter

Romp

Romp

Woodwinked

Woodwinked

Green Eyes:

Various shades of purple is the best colour for your green eyes. The contrast in color to your eyes will make them pop and seem more dramatic. If you want your eyes to stand out but look more natural, you may want to try warmer mocha brown shades or warm colors with slight orange or orange undertones. Basic eyeshadow colors for green eyes would be earth tones with slight hints of coppery bronze, taupe colors, mocha browns, deep burgundy and lavender/violet purple shades. Charcoal is also a great colour for you.

Parfait Amour

Parfait Amour

Satin Taupe

Satin Taupe

Nocturnelle

Nocturnelle

Embark

Embark

Sumptuous Olive

Sumptuous Olive

Smut

Smut

Sable

Sable

Woodwinked

Woodwinked

Sattelite Dreams

Sattelite Dreams

Sketch

Sketch

Club

Club

Brown Eyes

Brown eyes are the most versatile.  You can basically experiment with a variety of colours and still enhance your natural eye colour.  You can basically use any colour, as long as it does not make your eye look murky and dull.  Play around with purple, green, navy, blue, gold, silver, copper, brown, mahogany, deep espresso, pewter, deep green,taupe, navy,  etc.  You will not be competing with your natural eye colour.

Knight Divine

Knight Divine

Shimmer Moss

Shimmer Moss

Woodwinded

Woodwinded

Zonde Bleu

Zonke Bleu

Swimming

Swimming

Sattelite Dreams

Sattelite Dreams

Moons Reflection

Moons Reflection

Iris Mist

Iris Mist

Humid

Humid

Fresh Water

Fresh Water

Parfait Amour

Parfait Amour

Hazel Eyes:

Hazel eyes are not in a single colour. Hazel eyes are a mixture of colours, either green brown or green blue.  Choose the eye colour you want to enhance and refer to the corresponding colour category   If you have green-brown hazel eyes (like myself), you can choose colours from the green or brown category.

Grey Eyes:

This eye colour is basically a very bale blue or pale green, however the iris is surrounded by a dark ring.  Surrounding the eye colour with rich, deep eyeshadow and eyeliner will make your eye pop and glow. Choose colours from the corresponding category to enhance/bring out the blue or green in your eyes.

Choosing a combination of monochromatic colours (the two colours on either side of your eye colour) will also ‘compliment’ your eye colour.

My last tim for applying eyeshadow…play around with colour.  Never use just a single colour on your eye.  The key is to use complimenting colours that work well together and blend then to form a ‘new’ colour.  A single shade appears flat.  By combining 2 or more colours you create depth.  Even the loved Smokey Eye, when done beautifully & perfect, consists of a couple of monochromatic colours.

Take a look at all these eyes.  All of the makeup consists of multi colours perfectly blended.

Take a look at all these eyes. All of the makeup consists of multi colours perfectly blended.

Have fun playing around with colour.  Don’t be scared.  If you don’t like it, start over.  One last tip…for colours too vibrant or bright for your liking, add a little brown or black and blend well.  This will ‘dull out’ the colour.
(All Images: Google Images, Info: Looking younger by Robert Jones)

 

Period Makeup: 1930′s

The makeup look of the 1930s was sultry smokey and sexy, but lighter than the 20’s.  Dark eye colour was still used, but more concentrated to the crease of the eye.  It gives a striking dramatic look that is both feminine and strong.

1930s makeup is the easiest of the vintage pinup makeup styles to achieve.  During this time Hollywood had a huge influence on fashion, and the 30’s was when it really took hold. The movies of the day were silent and black and white.  The makeup that worked best visually in a silent black and white film is an exaggerated high contrast look.  This could explain why makeup of the 20’s and 30’s was so strong.

1930s-makeup-guide-tabber-image

Face:

  • As with the 20’s, the face is still pale and matt, but slightly more natural, and closer to the natural skin tone than the 20’s.
  • Foundation and powder was either white or ivory with a touch of pink.
  • As the 30s went on the foundation tones became more natural looking. Possibly as a result of the popularity of sunbathing, which people thought to be healthy at the time, after seeing Coco Chanel doing so.  (She actually fell asleep in the sun)

Blush/Rouge:

  • Blush was mainly light pinks getting gradually darker as the decade progressed, again probably because of sun bathing.
  • This would be applied to the lower apple of the cheeks slightly blended out into the hollow, beneath the cheekbone.

Eyes:

  • Eye shadows were generally matched to natural eye skin colour and combined 2 or 3 tones from the same colour group.
  • The middle tone goes over the whole lid up to the crease.
  • The darkest tone goes in the crease to give a dark mysterious look to the eyes. And the light colour goes on the brow bone as a highlight.
  • The darkest colour in the crease was in a ‘banana’ shape.
  • For evening wear iridescent and metallic powders and cream eye shadows were used over the whole eye area, from lash to above the crease and under the eye.
  • Not much eyeliner, if any, is required for this look. You can put a little liner pencil just along the lash line, but not extend beyond the outer edge of the eye.
  • Liquid liner was still not used.
  • One trick that was common in 1930s makeup eyes was to cover the whole eyelid with petroleum jelly. This was either worn alone to simply make the eyelid shiny, or dusted with iridescent powder.
  • The eyelashes were black and always curled.
  • False eyelashes were very popular for evening wear.

Brows:

  • Eyebrows were still thin, with an arch, but not as long and extremely unnaturally looking as in the 1920’s.
  • Many women actually shaved them off and drew in a hard line with brown eyeliner, slightly ‘feathered it out, to give a ‘more natural’ look, then painted over the top with petroleum jelly to make them shiny.

Lips:

  • In the early 30s pale pink tones were most popular with raspberry and red coming in second.
  • As the decade went on, it was the strong and dark colours that took over i.e. red-browns & brick-reds.
  • For the lip line, the natural lip shape was followed, but smooth and slightly elongated.  The cupids bow area was still important, but taking the pointiness down a bit.

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(Images: Google Images)